Speaking Up – Joel Lim

Our podcast can also be listened to here.

Who?

Joel Lim graduated from MTU 2 years ago. There he studies communications as well as visual communications. After graduating, Joel started working in a social media PR agency. Over the last year, some of his content on social media surrounding the GE2020 in Singapore went viral and from there, Joel decided to pursue that.

Quick Summary

What made you want to go into the industry and what was the journey like?

Joel has always had a big interest with social media so for his content to go viral, was a complete accident. Back in the day, Joel used Instagram for the photo filters to then post those photos on Twitter. He was always opinionated and used social media as a way to convey his message. During the GE2020, being held during the Covid-19 pandemic, people took their opinions online more than ever before. Joel noticed that during the general election, there was a much larger number of younger people who got interested in politics. Earlier in his journey, Joel Lim worked alongside influencers being part of a PR agency.

Why should students start to express their opinions more?

With social media, there is a large possibility of people’s voices being heard more than ever. Joel did mention that there are still haters and people using social media irresponsibly. However, as an individual who is making a conscious effort to use social media respectfully, it can really open up information and opportunities for people.

As an influencer in Singapore, has there ever been a fear of crossing the line and speaking out too much?

As mentioned, Joel never had a filter and was so opinionated. He had no fear of saying too much. Before going viral, it was easier to speak his mind because he felt small and didn’t think that his opinions would ever be truly heard by politicians. It felt easy for him to speak up because those people knew him in real life. Joel did not have a natural introduction into the industry because his content just blew up over a couple days. There was no real fear when his content did go viral as Joel was just speaking about his opinions. He did learn over time that there is a better way of approaching his opinions.

If you could leave the youth with one piece of advice, what would it be?

Despite the circumstances, enjoy the good parts.

The only way for people to hear you is to speak up.” – Joel Lim

30 under 30 – Andrew Mitson

Our podcast can also be listened to here.

Who?

Andrew Mitson has been featured twice in Forbes 30 under 30 for all his amazing achievements. Having studied in the London School of Economics after leaving school at 16 and self teaching his A Levels, Andrew has also taught there, winning LSE Class Teacher Award. Andrew worked and founded many companies such as InstaCourse, Up Learn and UniRise.

Quick Summary

What made you want to go into the industry and what was the journey like?

During his time in school, at the age of 16 he decided to drop out and start working on a product called the “cable stable”. This was the start of his entrepreneurship journey. Although that wasn’t successful, so he decided to study for his A Level exams in order to further study at university. He did so well that he got offers from Cambridge and LSE. His success made him realise how important and great e learning is. In his third year of university, he founded UpLearn which was an online platform for A Level candidates. Fast forward many start ups, at the age of 23 he realised how overwhelmed he was and it was all followed by a great loss in his family. Since then he has been travelling and exploring what he likes.

Having a lot of experience with education, what can a student do to overcome challenges with COVID19?

Andrew suggested that the biggest challenge that students face right now is the lack of social interaction. In the long run, he thinks that being online will be more beneficial. The beauty of online learning is that kids can do it at their own pace. If there is something you don’t understand, you can always rewind and learn it again. He thinks that students should embrace this challenge.

To what extent would you advocate going to university for the experience seeing as fees are rising?

Andrew thinks that it is still important to go to university as there is no real alternative for this experience. During university you make insane relationships that are worth so much. He would recommends going to a university that holds a name because that will still be valuable. If you are unable to do so, it is difficult to justify the price.

If you could leave the youth with one piece of advice, what would it be?

Don’t prematurely optimize.

” Don’t be pressured by society to jump into things– Andrew Mitson

Urban Farming – Bjorn Low

Our podcast can also be listened to here.

Who?

Bjorn Low is the Executive Director of Edible Garden City in Singapore. He is also a PhD candidate in RMIT. Bjorn was also the finalist for the 2018 Singaporean of the Year award.

Quick Summary

What made you want to go into the industry and what was the journey like?

When Bjorn went to school and university, he had no idea what he really wanted to do. He worked in enterprising for 7 years which allowed him to travel and move to London. During his time in London, he got really interested in farming. Himself and his wife left their jobs to try out agriculture. Bjorn decided to go to school and get certified for agriculture. He started a farm in UK but wanted to come back to Singapore in order to help develop the country’s agriculture.

There is a misconception that agriculture requires certain external factors (weather, space) how do you overcome that in a place like Singapore?

Everything stems from being inquisitive and trying to come up with innovative solutions. Bjorn mentioned that everyone wants to do the impossible, but that is only the initial push. Bjorn didn’t try to always grow crops that clearly wouldn’t flourish in Singaporean weather. He wanted to revisit crops and food that is local to the Singaporean culture.

What should be an incentive for the youth to go into social enterprises ?

Social enterprises in Singapore has been growing over the past 7 to 8 years. An important push factor is for people to use their skills. There is a big emotional factor where people feel like they have a purpose when they go to work.

If you could leave the youth with one piece of advice, what would it be?

Search for your passion and live that passion.

“It is human nature for people to want to grow something that hasn’t been grown before.– Bjorn Low

Sustainability and Fashion – Romina C

Our podcast can also be listened to here.

Who?

Romina is a business design consultant at the Chemistry Team. She is also the founder and blogger at Blaastyle. She was born in Switzerland but has a base in Singapore. After university and many experiences with brands and events, Romina has decided to make blogging and content creation, her full time job.

Quick Summary

What made you want to go into the industry and what was the journey like?

Fashion has always been a passion for Romina. Since a young age she has been reading, drawing and watching everything to do with Fashion so it was so surprise to her when she realised that that’s what she wanted to go into in her adulthood. When Romina starting blogging and vlogging, there was no real information about the topic during that time. Se had to figure out what to do herself and optimize her content to the best of her ability. After her entrepreneurial experience, Romina tried a more “structured” corporate job in Singapore, still in the fashion field. Realising it wasn’t for her, she moved to Tokyo to do consulting. Now she is in Singapore working with Chemistry Team.

What is the circular economy?

The concept has many definitions. Romina’s approach was taken from Ellen MacArthur. Circular economy is moving away from the linear “take make” economy and implement a closed loop in the value chain. The three principles that Ellen MacArthur mentioned are “design out waste and pollution”, “keep products and materials in use” and “regenerate natural systems.”

What is your opinion of fashion sustainability?

Romina said that because of her interest in sustainability in the fashion world, she slowed down her “influencer” job to take a step back and see what she can change in her day to day pattern. She said that with all the PR she was receiving from brands, it was causing too much individual waste as she couldn’t physically use everything she got.

If you could leave the youth with one piece of advice, what would it be?

Don’t dwell on an idea, just go out and do it!

“As organisations and people, we must adapt our current consumption model.” – Romina C